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search: home > Assessment > Mapping: Curriculum and Program Learning Objectives
Department of Physics

  Mapping: Curriculum and Learning Outcomes

 
Learning Outcome
Relevant Courses (PHYS)
Physics Knowledge
 
Demonstrate Understanding of how science and physics work in practice. 1020, 1040, 1080, 1100, 1200, 1800, 2110, 2120, 2210, 2220, 2215, 2225, 3870, 3880
Explain how experimental evidence can falsify scientific hypotheses and how it can contribute to acceptance of scientific concepts.
1040, 1200, 1800, 2110, 2120, 2210, 2220, 2215, 2225, 2710, 3710
Categorize the variety of approaches to research in physics; analyze the distinctive roles each approach plays in the development of physical explanations.

Distinguish physics from other sciences by explaining the differences in focus on subject matter, kinds of questions, kinds of explanations, and techniques.
1200, 2110, 2120, 2210, 2220
Identify main points of scientific ethics and responsibility relating to laboratory practice, work with students and collaborators, co-authorship, publication and public advocacy.
2215, 2225, 4900
Explain how science is a community effort and argue both the necessity of scientific cooperation and the advantages and disadvantages of solitary science.
1020, 1200, 2110, 2120, 2210, 2220, 2710, 3710
Identify and relate the major historical threads in the development of physics. Identify major contemporary issues in physics and a range of applications of physics in todayís economy.
1020, 1200, 2110, 2120, 2210, 2220, 2710, 3710
Solve correctly algebraic and calculus problems from typical bachelorís degree physics texts.
2110, 2120, 2210, 2220, 2710
Interpret the meaning of the mathematics that occurs in a particular physics context from typical bachelorís degree physics texts
 2110, 2120, 2210, 2220
Estimate orders of magnitude of physics quantities; estimate orders of magnitude of solutions to physics problems; explain how to identify quickly whether a problem solution or other physics quantity is of reasonable magnitude
1800, 2110, 2120, 2210, 2220, 3700
Graph related physics quantities in ways that illuminate underlying physical interpretations; interpret graphs from typical bachelorís degree physics texts.
1800, 2110, 2120, 2210, 2220, 3700
Build and work with mathematical models
2110, 2120, 2210, 2220, 3600, 3700, 4600, 4710, 4720 , 4900
Give examples of physics problems with similar mathematics but different physics
2110, 2120, 2210, 2220, 3600, 3700, 4600, 4710, 4720 , 4900
Organize a problem from a typical bachelorís degree physics text by identifying the relevant physics principles, identifying relevant vs. irrelevant quantities, and making appropriate diagrams.
2110, 2120, 2210, 2220
Organize quantitative information in a problem from a typical bachelorís degree physics text by clearly stepping through the mathematics of the problem solution.
 2110, 2120, 2210, 2220
Understanding and application of the fundamental notions of force and energy.
 1020, 1200, 1800, 2110, 2210
Understanding of the use of energy considerations to study complex systems from a thermodynamic viewpoint.
 2110, 2210, 3700
Understanding the fundamental interactions of nature, principally electromagnetism.
 1200, 1800, 2120, 2220, 3600, 3710, 4600
Understanding of the conceptual basis and elementary applications of relativity theory.4900
 2220, 3030, 3710, 4550
Analytical proficiency in the foundations and applications of Newtonian mechanics for understanding macroscopic dynamics.
 1200, 1800, 2110, 2210, 3550, 4550
Formulation and analysis of dynamical systems using Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods.
 3550, 4550
Understanding the conceptual basis, formalism and applications of quantum theory for understanding microscopic phenomena.
 2120, 2220, 2710, 4700, 4710
Understanding of the myriad phenomena of light, its propagation, and its interaction with various physical media.
 1200, 2120, 2220, 4600, 4650, 4680
Laboratory and Computer Skills

Follow practices necessary for safety in using undergraduate research or teaching laboratory equipment. Explain these practices to others, including identifying both potential dangers and ethical issues. Suggest how safety could be improved in a particular undergraduate research or teaching laboratory. 2110, 2120, 2215, 2225, 3870, 3880, 4900, 5870
Carry out error analysis on laboratory data; explain what the errors mean for data interpretation. 2215, 2225, 3870, 3880, 4900, 5870
Evaluate the quality of laboratory data; explain the importance of such evaluation. 3870, 3880, 4900, 5870
Design a laboratory measurement to answer a physics question on the level of typical bachelorís degree physics texts. 4900
Analyze the connections between what one measures and how one infers the physics interpretation of the measurements.
2110, 2120, 2215, 2225, 3870, 3880, 4900, 5870
Outline ethical laboratory practices and make arguments for their importance. Include ethics of reporting laboratory procedures and results as well as ethical practices in carrying out an experiment and reporting data. 4900
Apply critical analysis of the generation and collection of data to computer experiments.
4900, 5870
Research and Communication
 
Demonstrate physics research skills and understanding. 4900
Demonstrate the ability to communicate about science.
3870, 3880, 4900, 5870
Outline ethical research practices
3870, 3880, 4900, 5000, 5870